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Edible Mushrooms

Don't eat mushrooms you are not absolutely sure are edible!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Remember, though mushrooms can be a very pleasant culinary experience or--if misidentified--make you sick or kill you. Make sure you read the guide to pick edible mushrooms if you intend to pick mushrooms to be eaten.

If you do collect fungi for the table, do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Consider also that many of the edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes. Please read the disclaimer.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Bondarzewia berkeleyi   (Berkeley's polypore)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
Europe, North America, Africa, Asia
Dimensions
Fruiting Body 25-40 cm across
Edibility

Description
Bondarzewia berkeleyi, commonly known as Berkeley's polypore, or stump blossoms, is a species of polypore fungus in the family Russulaceae. It is a parasitic species that causes butt rot in oaks and other hardwood trees. Although Bondarzewia berkeleyi is edible, it has been compared to eating shoe leather.

Fruiting body The fan- or shelf-shaped caps grow in overlapping clumps from the bases of oak trees, each capable of growing to 25.5 cm diameter. They are various shades of white to pale grey, cream, beige or yellow. The pore surface is white, as is the spore print. The outer edges that cut easily with a knife are quite tender.

Bondarzewia berkeleyi on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Bovista plumbea   (Common Tumbling Puffball)
Family
Lycoperdaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
2-3 cm diameter * 2-3 cm tall
Edibility

Description
This small, white, rounded structure is attached to the stony surface by several strands. It often live scattered to clustered in disturbed areas, especially in sparse grass and pastures.

Fruiting body attached to the substrate by a tuft of mycelium, and spherical to slightly compressed. The surface is white, becoming buff to pale-tan and minutely tomentose. It is falling away in flakes at maturity to reveal dark grey papery contents. Spores are olive to sepia-brown.

Bovista plumbea on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Calocybe gambosa   (St George's Mushroom)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
Europe and North America
Dimensions
Cap 5-15 cm diameter; stem 3-7 cm tall x 2-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This is a medium to large, fleshy, cream agaric which typically grows in rings or troops on soil. It is most commonly found in pastures but also less frequently appearing in mixed woods.

Cap white-creamy coloured to bright yellow, often with brownish tinge. At first sub-spherical, becoming expanded and irregularly convex with an incurved margin. Gills sinuate, white and crowded. The flesh is thick and soft and has a mealy or cucumber smell. The spore print is white to pinkish white. Stem whitish, smooth, bulky at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Spring fruiting white Entoloma species are distinguished by pink spore deposits and pink mature gills.

Calocybe gambosa on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Cantharellula umbonata   (Grayling)
Family
Cantharellula
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
cap 2-3 cm dia; stem 2.5-12.5 cm tall * 0.3-0.7 cm dia.
Edibility

Description
This is a small to medium-sized, funnel-shaped agaric with grey cap and forked gills.

Cap convex at first, becoming flat to sunken; most specimens with a small, pointed umbo; margin incurved at first, becoming upturned and wavy in age; surface gray to grayish brown overall, often appearing to have whitish blotches; dry to moist; smooth to minutely hairy; flesh white; odor and taste not distinctive. Gills close to crowded, decurrent, repeatedly and regularly forked; whitish, developing spot-like reddish or sometimes yellow stains in age. Stem often with swollen portions; some-what flexible, often bent, curved, and/or twisted; white to gray; silky above, stuffed, usually with whitish mycelium binding the lower stalk to mass; often water-saturated near the base. Spore print white.

Similar species Cantharellus tubaeformis dingy-brown cap bearing forked veins instead of gills.
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Cantharellus cibarius   (Common Chantarelle)
Family
Cantharellaceae
Location
North America, Europe, Bhutan and China
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm across, stem 2-10 cm tall * 0.4-1.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This mushroom is typically orange or yellow, meaty and funnel-shaped. On the lower surface, underneath the smooth cap, it has gill-like ridges that run almost all the way down its stem, which tapers down seamlessly from the cap.

Cap light yellow, bright yellow to orange in colour, fading with age. As young formed as a button and then turns more cone shaped. The margin stays folded in for a long time and then often becomes wavy and uneven at maturity. The mushroom has gill-like veins under the cap, not gills. Flesh firm, thick, yellow. Stem solid, tapers downward from cap. The surface is smooth and the colour similar to the cap or a lighter yellow to almost white.

Similar spiecies Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca which is not mycorrhizal. Can also be confused with the poisonous mushrooms Omphalotus olearius, which has a luminous quality and grows on dead wood, and Cortinarius speciosissimus.

Cantharellus cibarius on the First Nature Web site.
Cantharellus cibarius on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Clitopilus prunulus   (Dread Dough Clitopilus)
Family
Entolomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
2-3 cm diameter * 2-3 cm tall
Edibility

Description
A pale gray-white cap and decurrent, pale pink gills, combined with a strong smell of fresh bread dough, distinguish this species.

Cap is convex to funnel-shaped that may have inrolled margin. Stem is central or off-center and is similar in color to the cap.

Similar species Species of Clitocybe and Entoloma can look very similar and are poisonous.

Clitopilus prunulus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Coprinus comatus   (Shaggy-mane Inky Cap)
Family
Coprinaceae
Location
North America, Europe, South America
Dimensions
Cap 5-15 cm tall * variable diameter, stem 10-30 cm tall * 1.5-2.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This agaric has a white, conical, shaggy cap which blackens. It grows in scattered trooping groups on soil in short grass.

Cap almost cylindrical cap which initially covers most of its stem. It is mostly white with shaggy scales, which are more pale brown at the apex. Gills free, colour change rapidly from white to pink, then to black. It is deliquescent. Spores are black. Stem is white, smooth, often very tall, slightly swollen at base and sometimes rooting. It has a loose ring which is white, thin and often slipping down stem towards base. The flesh is white, hollow and fragile and the taste mild.

Coprinus comatus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius caperatus   (Gypsy Mushroom)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe, East Asia
Dimensions
Cap 5-12 cm diameter, stem 4-10 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This agaric is egg-shaped on emerging, the cap becomes convex to umbonate with age. It is yellow-brown with a wrinkled surface and remnants of the white to lilac veil in the center. The smooth stem has a narrow, sheathing ring, also known as a partial veil, which is a key identifying feature of the mushroom.

Cap yellow-brown to brownish-ochre, which is covered with whitish fibres. The surface has a wrinkled and furrowed texture. It may have a lilac tinge when young. Initially convex before expanding and flattening with a boss (umbo) in the centre. Gills pallid buff or clay, adnate, crowded. Spores are pale brown. Stem slightly swollen at the base, and is whitish with a whitish ring, which is initially attached to the cap.

Similar species Cortinarius species are related, but have no true stem rings and have rust-brown spores.

Cortinarius caperatus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Cortinarius caperatus on the MushroomExpert.Com web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.