MUSHROOM WORLD
www.mushroom.world
Your resource for fungi information

Edible Mushrooms

Don't eat mushrooms you are not absolutely sure are edible!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Remember, though mushrooms can be a very pleasant culinary experience or--if misidentified--make you sick or kill you. Make sure you read the guide to pick edible mushrooms if you intend to pick mushrooms to be eaten.

If you do collect fungi for the table, do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Consider also that many of the edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes. Please read the disclaimer.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Lactarius deliciosus   (Saffron Milk Cap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 3-6 cm tall * 1.5 - 2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This attractive, fairly large, buff agaric with distinctive salmon -pink blotches, pale carrot colour gills exudes carroty milk. It grows grows solitary or in scattered groups on soil under conifers, favouring pine trees.

Cap first round and bumpy, then convex and as mature flat with a depressed center. The margin stays rolled in until maturity. It has concentrically zoned thin rings in orange and somewhat wider zone in salmon go gray pink. Often with carrot colored patches. Sticky and slippery when wet. Gills at first apricot or saffron, becoming carrot, dull green on bruising, dense and sub-decurrent before abruptly ending. Stem similarly coloured as cap, thick and hard but also fragile, more or less equal, and patterned with different-sized shallow holes in a darker shade.

Similar species Lactarius deterrimus found with spruce trees has a smooth stem and exudes green staining orange milk.

Lactarius "deliciosus" group on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Lactarius deterrimus   (Orange milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 3-6 cm tall * 1.5 - 2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This large, buff agaric has distinct salmon-pink blotches, pale carrot gills and carroty milk. It grows by itself or in groups scattered throughout soil under conifers, particularly pine and spruce trees.

Cap first round with a slightly depressed center and rolled-in margin. Then shallow to funnel shaped. It has orange coloured zones that turn greener with age. Sticky or slippery when wet. Gills dense and slightly extending downward. Same colour as cap. Stem is similar in color as the cap, smooth, Tough, but at the same time delicate and fragile. Flesh dirty gray colored. It turns orange at the edges because of the carrot coloured milky liquid that escapes when broken. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius deliciosus which grows with pine trees and the poisonous Lactarius helvus.

Lactarius deterrimus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Lactarius mammosus
Family
Russulaceae
Location
At least in Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2.5-5.5 cm diameter; stem 3-7 cm tall x 0.5-1 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This largish agaric has a gray cap and pale gills and stem. Exuding milk, it grows solitary or in scattered groups on boggy soil under coniferous trees, mainly pine.

Cap convex, later flattening or with a depression, sometimes with a fiat to pointed umbo, margin at first somewhat inrolled; brownish, vinaceous-grey to umber or hazel, sometimes with one or more concentric bands; moderately thick, firm, surface dry, of feathery, adpressed fibres breaking into small, low, fibrous scales. Gills adnate to slightly decurrent, crowded; rosy buff, later darker with an orange tinge. Milk white; taste mild, then hot or very hot, smell of coconut.Spores Spore print cream. Flesh whitish to buff. Stem whitish or tinged with the cap colour, bruising pale cinnamon-brown. It has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius rufus which has more brown color and Lactarius trivialis which exudes transparent milk.
Share link

Lactarius rufus   (Red-hot Lactarius)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 4-8 cm tall * 0.5-2 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This small to medium-sized agaric has a dull reddish brown cap, creamy white gills and exudes milk.

Cap dry and velvety with a powdery matte texture and never sticky. It is reddish or bay-brown coloured, at first convex with inrolled margin, later flattened or slightly depressed typically with a small central umbo, Gills first creamy white, later more similarly colored as the cap, sub-decurrent, which means they travel partially down the stem and are fairly crowded. Spores are off white. Stem is similarly colored as the cap or more pallid, smooth and tapers off and darkens toward the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Lactarus hepaticus exudes white milk that stains yellow as it dries.

Lactarius rufus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Share link

Lactarius torminosus   (Woolly Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-12 cm diameter, stem 4-8 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This largish, salmon-pink, distinctively woolly agaric exudes milk.

Cap at first round with a slightly depressed center and rolled-in margin. Then shallow to severely funnel shaped. It has a shaggy surface that has zones in shades of orange and orange-brown. Gills are pallid buff or salmon, extending downward, narrow, and crowded. Spores are pale yellowish cream. Stem is similarly colored as the cap but more pallid. It is short, smooth more or less equal or tapering at both ends. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius pubescens is paler with fainter zones. It has a less shaggy cap. Lactarius scoticus is smaller and also pale.

Lactarius torminosus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Share link

Lactarius trivialis   (Slimy Lead Lactarius)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-15 cm diameter, stem 6-12 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This largish agaric has a violet cap and pale gills and stem. It exudes white milk and grows solitary or in scattered groups on boggy soil under coniferous trees and birches.

Cap smooth, greasy, later depressed in the center and at first purplish violet with darker zones, becoming brownish gray or pinkish beige. Gills pale cream, crowded and slightly decurrent. Spores are pale yellow. Stem may be quite long, pallid with tint of cap colour and later often hollow. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius argillaceflius grows in eastern North America under oaks with gills that stain and age brownish.

Lactarius trivialis on Wikipedia.
Share link

Lactarius volemus   (Luscious Lactarius)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-11 cm diameter, stem 4-12 cm tall * 1-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This very fleshy, matte orange species has a thin, cracking skin on its cap and a thick, velvety pale orange stem. When cut, its off-white, mild tasting flesh produces white milk.

Cap dry and velvety with a powdery matte texture and never sticky. Matte orange to red-brown coloured. At first slightly convex and develops a depression in the center later. The margin stays inrolled for some time. Gills creamy white, broadly attached to the stem slightly extending downward and densely packed. Turns brown when bruised. White drops often hangs under the gills. Stem is similarly colored as the cap but more pallid. Tapers off and darkens towards the base. It has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius hygrophoroides is a good edible lacking the odor. It is equally common in eastern North America. It does not stain and has distant gills.

Lactarius volemus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Laetiporus sulphureus   (Chicken of the Woods)
Family
Polyporaceae
Location
Europe and North America
Dimensions
Cap 5 to 60 cm in diameter and 4 cm thick
Edibility

Description
The fruit bodies of this mushroom grow as striking golden-yellow shelf-like structures on tree trunks and branches. The undersurface of the fruit body is made up of tubelike pores rather than gills.

Fruiting body attached directly to the trunk of a tree and is initially knob-shaped, later expands to fan-shaped, typically overlapping shelves with thick margin. The upper surface color ranges from bright whitish-yellow to bright whitish-orange. Flesh soft and coloured as cap surface. Old fruitbodies fade to tan or whitish. The under surface is sulphur-yellow with small pores or tubes and has a white spore print. When fresh, the flesh is succulent and exudes a yellowish juice, but soon becomes dry and brittle. It has a strong, fungusy smell.

Laetiporus sulphureus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

« Previous Page 1234567 Next Page »




WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.