MUSHROOM WORLD
www.mushroom.world
Your resource for fungi information

Edible Mushrooms

Don't eat mushrooms you are not absolutely sure are edible!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Remember, though mushrooms can be a very pleasant culinary experience or--if misidentified--make you sick or kill you. Make sure you read the guide to pick edible mushrooms if you intend to pick mushrooms to be eaten.

If you do collect fungi for the table, do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Consider also that many of the edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes. Please read the disclaimer.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Leccinum aurantiacum   (Red-capped scaber stalk)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
Europe, North America
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter, stem 8-14 cm tall * 1.5-4.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This large or massive bolete has a deep orange cap, whitish pores and a scaly stem, which is darkening throughout where cut or bruised. It grows solitary or in small scattered groups on soil specifically under aspen.

Cap bright orange skin, at first round like a ball, then ovate or bun-shaped. It is sticky when damp and has, just like Leccinum versipelle, a larger skin that hangs down or is tucked under the margin of the cap. Flesh creamy-white then vinaceous or sepia where cut. Thick and firm. Pores white or cream, darkening vinaceous where bruised, circular. very small. Spores are ochraceous-buff. Stem dirty white, covered with woolly scales in irregular network, at first white then rust, stoutish, more or less equal or swollen towards base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species The most similar species is Leccinum versipelle, which differing from Leccinum aurantiacum grows under birch trees.

Leccinum aurantiacu on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Share link

Leccinum scabrum   (Brown Scaber-stalk Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-15 cm diameter, stem 6-15 cm tall * 1.5-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Medium to large bolete with brown cap, dirty white spores and scaly stem. Grows specifically with birch, often on damp gound.

Cap brown, with reddish or grayish tinges; convex or bun-shaped, at first finely downy, becoming smooth, somewhat scurfy when older. Flesh dirty white, unchanging, thick and firm. Pores dirty white or grayish brown, circular, small. Tubes same color as pores, adnate. Spores are ocher-brown. Stem whitish, covered with gray-brown scales, more or less equal or tapering slightly upwards. Ring absent.

Similar species Distinguishing between Leccinum scabrum and its near relatives is difficult, and Leccinum scabrum is often used as a collective name for all brown capped Leccinum species like Leccinum variicolor.

Leccinum scabrum on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Share link

Leccinum versipelle   (Orange Scaber-stalk Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 8-20 cm diameter, stem 8-20 cm tall * 1.5-4 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This large or massive bolete, that can weigh up to 1.5 kg and has a distinctive orange cap, grayish yellow pores and a scaly stem; it grows solitary or in small scattered groups on soil specifically under birch trees and on heaths.

Cap clear orange or red brown. Round to start with, then oval and finally convex. Grainy or smooth as dry, and sticky when damp. The orange cap skin hangs down over the margin. Pores are circular and small. They are at first whitish, then buff, darkening rust where bruised. Tubes are similarly colored as the pores, wine colored where cut, and depressed. Spores are ocher-brown. Stem black tufts on a gray-white base that get sparser with age and often thicker at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Leccinum versipelle on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Share link

Lepista nuda   (True Blewit)
Family
Thricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-12 cm diameter, stem 5-9 cm tall * 1.5-2.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This is a medium-sized, fleshy agaric, with a brownish cap and lilac gills. It grows in trooping groups, often in rings, on soil in mixed woods, hedgerows, parks and gardens.

Cap violet-brown, emerges dark and bun-shaped, becoming convex and then flattened. It's colour becomes paler from the marigin as the cap surface dries. The flesh bluish lilac, thick, firm. Gills lilaceous, attached to the short, stout stem. Spores are pink. Stem colored as cap, more or less equal, fibrillose and often slightly thickened at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Unrelated poisonous look-alikes include species of Entoloma, Cortinarius and Hebeloma. Cortinarius mushrooms often have the remains of a veil under their caps and a ring-like impression on their stem.

Clitocybe nuda on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Lycoperdon excipuliforme   (Pistle-shaped Puffball)
Family
Lycoperdaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
3-10 cm diameter * 8-20 cm tall
Edibility

Description
This pale buff or brown, pestle-shaped fungus occurs solitary most often, however it sometimes is found in small troops on soil in pastures and woodlands.

Fruiting body Covered with short spines and warts, the body falls away pallid buff becoming dull brown. When mature, the outer skin breaks open and brown spores are dispersed by wind and rain. When young and firm, the fruit-bodies are fairly tasteless yet edible. Stem slightly tapering in at the base; spongy; surface soon becoming wrinkled; initially white with pointed warts, but later turning ochre and becoming smooth and leathery.

Similar species Calvatia elata is widespread and common in North America. Lycoperdon molle resembles a short-stemmed specimen.

Synonyms Handkea excipuliformis

Lycoperdon excipuliforme on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Share link

Lycoperdon perlatum   (Common Puffball)
Family
Lycoperdaceae
Location
North America, Europe, South America
Dimensions
2.5-6 cm diameter * 2-9 cm tall
Edibility

Description
Rounded, typically with a distinct stem, this white to yellowish brown species is covered with short spines, each surrounded by smaller, grainlike scales. Grows typically in troops on soil in mixed woodland.

Fruiting body white, becoming ochre-brown, covered with short pyramidial warts which fall off to reveal endoperidium decorated with a reticulate patter; sub-spherical opening by an apical pore, the fertile head tapering down into a distinct, sterile, basal region. Spore mass at first white and firm, becoming olive-brown and powdery. Spores are pale yellow to olive-brown.

Similar species Lycoperdon nigrescens has longer, darker spines in groups, like those of the much longer-spined Lycoperdon echinatum. The surface of both has a similar pattern when the spines fall off.

Lycoperdon perlatum on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Lycoperdon pyriforme   (Stump Puffball)
Family
Lycoperdaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
1.5-4 cm diameter, 1-5 cm tall
Edibility

Description
It is smallish, white or grey-brown, having a pear-shaped structure on a pedestal. Grows typically in troops on rotten wood or stumps, sometimes submerged so that the fruiting bodies appear to be growing on soil.

Fruiting body often pear-shaped, but may also be nearly spherical. When very young covered in small white spines that typically fall off before maturity. Colour ranges from nearly white to yellowish brown with the darker shades developing with age. Spore mass at first white and firm, becoming olive-brown and powdery. Spores are olive-brown.

Similar species Found in open, wooded areas, Lycoperdon lividium is also smooth, but is grayer and has warty spores (those of Lycoperdon pyriforme are almost smooth).

Lycoperdon pyriforme on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Macrolepiota procera   (Parasol Lepiota)
Family
Agaricaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 10-25 cm diameter; stem 15-30 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
A large, distinctive, pale brownish agaric, it has a scaly cap, white gills, and a pale brownish stem with ring; it grows solitary, scattered or clustered on soil in open grassy places and in mixed woods.

Cap pallid brown decorated with darker brown broad scales, starts off egg shaped and then bell shaped until the cap margin detaches from the stripe. The base colour becomes lighter with age. Dark scales appear on top when the brown surface cracks up from the smooth, central bump. Gills are white, free, and crowded. Flesh creamy white and soft. Stem is distinctive grey-brown with banded markings on a whitish background, long and thin with an onion shaped base. Above the dubble-edged ring that often falls off, it is evenly brown and below this, it is irregularly striped in a zigzag pattern. Ring is white above and brown below.

Similar species The poisonous Chlorophyllum molybdites has a stouter stalk and a green spore print.

Macrolepiota procera on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

« Previous Page 134567 Next Page »




WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.