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Edible Mushrooms

Don't eat mushrooms you are not absolutely sure are edible!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Remember, though mushrooms can be a very pleasant culinary experience or--if misidentified--make you sick or kill you. Make sure you read the guide to pick edible mushrooms if you intend to pick mushrooms to be eaten.

If you do collect fungi for the table, do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Consider also that many of the edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes. Please read the disclaimer.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Russula paludosa   (Tall Bog Russula)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter, stem 5-14 cm tall * 1-3 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Taller than most, this large, attractive Russula species has a convex to depressed, orange-red cap, with yellow discoloration in the center and a slightly sticky surface when damp.

Cap variable, reddish with apricot, bay, blood or scarlet tinges; at first convex, later flattened and depressed, shiny or somewhat sticky when damp, cuticle peeling halfway to center. Flesh white, moderate, granular and brittle. Gills are cream or pallid ochraceous, adnexed, brittle, narrow, strongly interveined. Spores pale ocher. Stem white or tinged pink, more or less equal or tapering slightly upwards, smooth. Ring absent. Flesh white, fragile and stuffed.

Similar species The poisonous and hot-tasting Russula emetica has no yellow coloring on the cap.

Russula paludosa on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Russula xerampelina   (Crab Russula)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter; stem 3-11 cm tall * 1-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This is a medium to large agaric, hard-fleshed cap; color varies, often dark red or purple. Mature plats have a fishy odor. All parts slowly stain dingy yellow-brown when cut or bruised.

Cap convex, becoming later flat, with a broad, shallow depression. Surface sticky when moist, but soon dry; smooth - not streaked or warty. Color most often dark red, but may be dark purple, pink, green or brown, often with traces of yellow. Gills broad, close to subdistant, adnate, yellowish white. Stem solid at first, later spongy. Surface white or flushed with pink; dry, smooth to wrinkled.

Russula xerampelina on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Sarcodon squamosus   (Scaly Tooth)
Family
Bankeraceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 10-25 cm diameter, stem 4-7 cm tall * 2-4 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Large, coarsely scaly, gray cap with dark grayish, spiny under-surface. Grows with pines solitary or in scattered groups, on soil in coniferous woods.

Fruiting body cap grayish, decorated with coarse darker gray scales, erect at the centre, more flattened towards the incurved margin, arranged in concentric rows; at first shallowly convex, then flattened or slightly depressed at the centre; at first whitish, becoming gray, remaining pallid at the base, equal or somewhat clavate towards the base, downy. Flesh white, thick in the cap centre, firm, full in stem. Spines at first white or pallid, then gray with purplish brown tinge, decurrent.

Sarcodon squamosus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus bovinus   (Euro Cow Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
Europe and Asia
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 4-6 cm tall * 0.5-1 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This usually small, orange-rusty brown bolete, with it's convex to flat cap and short, ringless stem, is notable for it's compound pores: the olive-green pore layer has an outer layer of coarse; angular pores and an inner layer of fine pores.

Cap ochraceous or pinkish clay, more pallid at margin; convex or bun-shaped, smooth, sticky or viscid when damp. Flesh white with pinkish clay tinge, thick and soft. Pores at first pallid olive or buff, becoming more ochraceous with age, angular, compound, unequal, large. Tubes grayish with vinaceous tinge, more or less decurrent. Spores brownish olive. Stem pallid yellowish sienna, more or less equal or tapering at base. Ring absent.

Suillus bovinus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus grevillei   (Larch Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 5-7 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This vividly colored bolete grows with larch trees in woods. The mushroom is slimy, with yellow cap, small pores and whitish ring on stem.

Cap chrome-yellow, rust with age; convex or bun-shaped, smooth, shiny and sometimes wrinkled when dry, sticky or viscid when damp. Flesh is pallid lemon-yellow, unchanging, moderate, soft. Pores at first pallid lemon-yellow, becoming more ochraceous and tinged rust where bruised, angular, small. Tubes pallid yellow and slightly decurrent. Spores Yellowish brown. Stem colored as cap, tinged more rust below, slightly woolly or granular, slender, more or less equal or slightly swollen at base. Ring pallid whitish, superior, pointing upwards.

Suillus grevillei on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus luteus   (Slippery Jack Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe, East Asia
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 2-3 cm thick
Edibility

Description
This is a medium to large bolete with slimy, brown cap. Short to stubby stalk has brown dots and a well-developed ring.

Cap Rounded to nearly flat. Chestnut or sepia-brown, smooth, shiny and somewhat wrinkled when dry, very glutinous when damp, margin sometimes retaining velar remnants. Flesh whitish with yellow tinge, unchanging, moderate and soft, unchanging when cut. Pores at first pallid lemon-yellow or straw, becoming more dirty yellow or sienna-brown with age, circular, medium. Tubes concolorous with pores, adnate. Spores Ocher-brown. Stem Cylindrical or tapered downwards; solid. Yellow and dotted above ring; whitish below, especially at base. Ring at first whitish, darkening with age, vinaceous-brown below and large.

Suillus luteus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Suillus variegatus   (Variegated Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-13 cm diameter, stem 5-9 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Tall-stemmed and fleshy, the Suillus variegatus rarely exhibits the slimminess that is characteristic of the genus suillus.

Cap sandy to rusty brown coloured. At first ovate and then convex. The skin can be removed. It has a freckly, downy surface in dry weather. Flesh pallid ochraceous and turns blue when cut and thumbed. Pores at first ochraceous with olivaceous tinge, becoming more cinnamon-brown with age, sometimes bluish where bruised. Tubes are dark ochraceous or buff, adnate. Stem smooth and firm. Mottled yellow to a brown yellow and thicker at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Suillus tomentosus is the equivalent species in western North America.

Suillus tomentosus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Tricholoma flavovirens   (Edible Yellow Trich)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 1.5-2.5 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
This is an agaric with medium to large cap; vivid yellow, brown at center; no black streaks or fibrils. Gills yellow.

Cap broadly convex or nearly flat, with an inrolled margin at first; expanding to broadly convex or flat, often with a broad, low, central hump. Pale yellow at first, then greenish yellow to vivid yellow and usually remaining yellow on margin but gradually becoming brown from disk center outward. Flesh thick, firm; white or tinged with yellow under cuticle. Gills notched around apex of stem, close, broad; edges become ragged with age. Gills attached to the stem, often by means of a notch; close, bright yellow, not staining when bruised. Stem more or less equal, or enlarged at base; solid or hollowed in age. Surface smooth to fibrillose; pale to light yellow.

Similar species Be sure to distinguish from Tricholoma sulphureum and from Tricholoma sejunctum, both of which are poisonous.

Tricholoma equestre (Tricholoma flavovirens) on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.