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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Albatrellus confluens
Family
Polyporaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 7-18 cm diameter, stem 3-7 cm tall * 1-3 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
From above, this pale orange polypore looks like an agaric or a hedgehog mushrooom, but it has minute pores on the underside. The skin of the convex cap often cracks with age. It has a sturdy stem and very firm, mild to slightly bitter white flesh. Grows under conifers, mycorrhizal with conifers in a wide variety of ecosystems.

Similar species Albatrellus ovinus is more cream white and does stain yellow or greenish yellow, particularly on the pores.
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Amanita ceciliae
Family
Pluteaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 7-12 cm diameter, stem 8-13 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This large, grayish brown, fleshy agaric has a scaly stem, white gills, and no ring or volval bag.

Cap is pallid gray-brown; it is convex becoming more expanded and then narrowed at the margin. Large, coarse, dingy gray patches decorate the volva. Flesh is white and firm. Gills are white, free, and crowded. Stem is pallid, grayish brown with white shaggy horizontal bands of veil; an inconspicuous bulb is encased in a volval bag breaking away leaving slanting ridges. Ring is absent.
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Amanita fulva   (Tawny grisette)
Family
Pluteaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-9 cm diameter, stem 7-12 cm tall * 0.8-1.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Medium-sized agaric , distinctive tawny cap and white gills, no ring, usually without cap patches but with volval bag; solitary or scattered on soil in mixed woodlands, favouring birch. Not recommended to be eaten because of danger to be mistaken with poisonous members of the Amanita genus.

Cap tan or orange-brown with sulcate margin, occasionally with brownish velar patches, at first ovoid, becoming expanded-convex and flattened with a slight umbo. Flesh white and brittle. Stem whitish or pallid cap coulor, narrower towards the apex and arising from white volval bag. Ring absent. Hollow in marture specimens.

Similar species Amanita crocea and Amanita vaginata.
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Auriscalpium vulgare   (Pinecone Tooth)
Family
Auriscalpiaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1-2 cm diameter; stem 2-6 cm tall * 0.1-0.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Small long medium, brown cap, attached at one side or off center. Long, slender, stalk rises from decaying pine cones.

Cap flat to rounded. Upper side brown to dark purplish brown, covered with dark brown fibrils. Under side spiny. Flesh thin, flexible. Spines light to dark brown. Stem brown, hairy, rigid, joined laterally to the cap, swollen towards the base.
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Bankera fuligineoalba   (Blushing Flagrant Tooth)
Family
Bankeraceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter; stem 2-5 cm tall * 0.5-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Medium-sized, yellowish brown, fleshy to fibrous cap with spiny under surface.

Cap convex at first, becoming flat or depressed at center. At first pallid, then brown with yellow or red tinges, remaining more pallid at the margin. Pine needles adhere to densely mattered surface fibrils. Flesh soft and brittle. Stem white at the apex, becoming dull brownish below, equal or tapered towards the base, downy, sometimes eccentric.

Similar species Bankera violascens has a clean, regularly shaped cap with lilac tints; it grown with spruce. Sarcodon species have colored spores.
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Calocera viscosa   (Antler jelly)
Family
Dacryomycetaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
3-10 cm tall
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Yellow, antler-like, gelatinous fruiting bodies; in tufts or stumps and roots of coniferous trees. Branches are sometimes flattened and sometimes forked at tips.

Fruiting body golden-yellow when damp, more orange-yellow when dry, antler shaped with repeated dichotomous branching. The forks are somewhat slimy when wet.

Similar species Calocera cornea has small, unbrached clubs and grows on deciduous twigs. Calocera furcata is forked and grows on pine wood. Paler Calocera pallidospathulata is flattened and irregular. Gymnospoarngium clavariiforme, found on juniper, is less erect and without branches at the tips.
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Calocybe persicolor   (Pink Lawn Trich)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-5 cm diameter, stem 3-5 cm tall * 0.3-0.8 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
A small, fleshy agaric with flesh-pink cap and white gills. It often grows on soil in grass in parks and mixed woods; it is less frequent in open grasslands.

Cap is dirty pink; at first convex, it expands with a somewhat irregular margin. Towards the margin, cap is smooth and covered with whitish dust or bloom. Flesh is white with pink tinge beneath cuticle. Gills are white, narrow and crowded. Stem is pallid similarly colored as the cap. Its finely fibrillose surface hairy at the base, tapers slightly upwards.

Similar species Calocybe carnea is less dull without the hairy stem base.
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Chalciporus piperatus   (Peppery Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-5 cm diameter, stem 4-6 cm tall * 0.3-1 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
A very small bolete that is cinnamon-brown throughout, except for the chrome-yellow stem flesh; it does not stain blue on bruising. The slightly greasy cap is convex in shape, and the stem is slender; the tubes are 0.3-1 cm long. The flesh has an intensely hot and peppery flavor, making this species inedible, although is has been used as spice.

Cap tubes are adnate to decurrent. Pores are angular cinnamon to rust brown. Spores are susty brown.

Similar species Chalciporus piparatoides it similar but can be distinguished by the blue bruising of its cap, tubes, and pores. Chalciporus amarellus has pinker coloring and a less peppery taste.
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