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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Cortinarius collinitus
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-10 cm diameter, stem 7-12 cm tall, 1-2.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
A orange-brown cap, which is convex or has a wavy margin, and a sturdy white stem are good indicators of this species. Both the cap and the white stem are covered in the slimy remains of the veil which is blue-tinged. The mushroom occurs with spruce.

cap is convex to flat in shape, with a sticky, gelatinous surface (in moist conditions). Gills are adnexed, close, and pallid or pale violet in color. Stem solid, equal, and has transverse scaly-looking bands. The spore print, like most Cortiniarius species, is rusty-brown. Edibility is unknown for this species.

Similar species Cortinarius mucosus.

Cortinarius collinitus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius croceus   (Saffron Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1.5 - 3 cm diameter; stem 2.5 - 8.5 cm tall x 0.3-0.5 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This small agaric with tawny-brown cap, yellowish tawny gills and slender, yellowish stem with faint ring zone grows solitary or in scattered trooping groups on soil in coniferous woods.

[Description is under work.]

Cortinarius croceus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius laniger   (Woolly Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-8 cm diameter, stem 6-10 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This medium sized agaric with dull, somewhat tomentose, reddish brown cap and rust -brown gills has pale brown, belted stem tinged lilac at the apex. It grows solitary or in scattered trooping groups on wet mossy soil in or near upland coniferous woods.

[Description is under work.]

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Cortinarius malicorius
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1.5-5 cm diameter, stem 2-7 cm tall * 0.6-1.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
The young gills of this Cortinarius are orange, which helps to separate it from many similar species. Habitat in coniferous woods.

Cap hemispherical then broadly convex; brownish cinnamon, margin more yellow; fibrillose to minutely scaly. Gills Attached to the stem but sometimes pulling away from it in age; close; orange at first, becoming cinnamon to rusty. Stem middle slightly swollen at the base, soon hollow; bright yellow often with reddish area near the base; corona yellow. Flesh yellow. Odor slight. Taste slight.

Cortinarius malicorius on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius mucosus   (Orange Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-10 cm diameter, stem 6-10 cm tall * 1-2.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This medium to large agaric is very slimy with a yellowish brown cap, cinnamon or rust colored gills, a stout white stem with ring zone and slightly swollen base. It grows typically with pine or birch.

Cap coloured dark reddish to to orange brown, convex or wavy margined, smooth, very sticky. Gills gray to cinnamon brown, sinuate, adnate. Spores are rusty brown. Stem is white with rust sub-apical cortinal zone. It is smooth or faintly scaly below cap, more or less equal or slightly swollen at base, and very sticky. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Cortinarius collinitus occurs with spruce. It has a blue -tinged slime on its stem. Other similar species grow under different host trees.

Cortinarius mucosus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius traganus   (Gassy webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-8 cm diameter, stem 5-12 cm tall, 0.6-1.2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This agaric has a convex to umbonate, fleshy, silvery violet cap.

Cap initially spherical to convex, with the margin rolled inward, then flattened, sometimes with large, broad, central umbo. The margin often cracks star-like, particularly in dry weather. The mushroom is first pale azure violet to pale lilac color, later fading to tan brown or rusty brown. The cap is dry, silkily shiny or tomentose at the margin with membranaceous bronze fragments of the veil. Later the surface becomes cracked into small scales. The gills are sub-crowded, quite thick, broadly adnate, and often slightly emarginate. They are broad, slightly dirty violet when young but usually brown, with only faintly violet tint, later brown, dusted saffron ochre, and with lighter crenulate edge. Stem tough and thick, bulbously at the base, and spongily stuffed inside. It is vivid violet for a long time in the upper part above the cortina, paler below, and covered with a tough, whitish, boot-like veil, which usually leaves upright zones on the stem. The cortina is violet. The flesh is saffron yellowish-brown to yellowish-brown from the beginning except at the tip of the stem where it is dirty violaceous. It has a strong, bitter taste, particularly when young.

Mycorrhizal, usually with deciduous trees, but also found with conifers, often on acidic soil.

Similar species Cortinarius malachius has a slightly scaly cap. Cortinarius camphoratus is similar in appearance and is also violet, but it has pale violet gills which soon turn rusty, and a longer stem with paling flesh at the base. It is associated with conifers, as are Cortinarius alboviolaceus.

Cortinarius traganus on Wikipedia.
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Cystoderma amianthinum   (Powdercap)
Family
Thricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-5 cm diameter, stem 3-5 cm tall * 0.4-0.8 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This small to medium, fleshy agaric with ochre-yellow cap, white or cream gills has a coarsely granular stem with ring. It grows solitary or scattered in small tufted groups on soil among short grass in coniferous woods and on heaths.

Cap ochraceous or yellowish tan, convex to bell-shaped, and later flat with a slight depression around a low umbo (central boss). It is dry and powdery, often with a shaggy or fringed margin. Gills initially white, becoming creamy later. They are adnexed (narrowly attached to the stem), and initially quite crowded. Spore print is white. Stem cylindrical, and has a flaky-granular sheath beneath a fleeting, powdery ring. Flesh dirty yellow, firm and stuffed.

Cystoderma amianthinum on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Entoloma sericeum   (Silky Pinkgill)
Family
Entolomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-4 cm diameter, stem 2-7 cm tall * 0.15-0.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
This small agaric has a dark brownish grey cap and stem, with pale gills. It grows solitary, or in small trooping groups on soul in grass and on open moorland.

Cap initially conical, developing an umbo as it becomes broadly convex; hygrophanous, darker brown when wet and much paler, often streaky buff when dry; surface smooth with silky radial fibrils. Flesh same color as cap or more pallid. Gills sinuate; pale grey at first, becoming pinkish grey and eventually brown. Spores are pink. Stem same color as cap, more pallid at the apex and base, silky fibrillose, more or less equal, base slightly swollen. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species There are several Entoloma species that are similar in appearance, such as Entoloma cetratum, which is warmer honey brown and Entoloma conferendum which has star-shaped spores.

Entoloma sericeum on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.