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Poisonous Mushrooms

Here is a list of some poisonous mushrooms, of which many are deadly poisonous. Do not under any circumstances taste or eat of any of these mushrooms.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Coprinus atramentarius   (Alcohol Inky Cap)
Family
Coprinaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-7 cm tall * variable diameter, stem 7-14 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm thick
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
This conical agaric is medium-sized, greyish brownish and later blackening; it grows generally in tufts, in fields, gardens and waste ground, near broad-leaf tree stumps or buried wood. It sometimes pushes up through tarmac paths and less frequently near the bases of living trees.

Cap egg-shaped, expanding to become slightly umbonate with age. The colour is gray to gray-brown. Flesh is white, hollow and medium in young specimens but soon discolors and deliqueces slowly from the margin. Gills free, extremely crowded and edged with white. Spores are black. Stem is white and smooth with fine, reddish brown fibrils at base.

Similar species Coprinus insignis has warty spores. Coprinus micaeus is smaller and more fragile. It granulates when young.

Coprinopsis atramentaria on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius orellanus   (Fool's Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-7 cm diameter, stem 3-8 cm tall * 0.5-1.3 cm diameter
Edibility
Lethally poisonous

Description
This is a medium sized agaric with tawny brown, bluntu umbonate cap. The gills are colored as the stem. Grows solitary of in scattered trooping groups, with broad-leaf trees. The mushroom is lethally poisonous.

Cap bell-shaped, with a sharply inrolled margin at first, expanding to convex or flat, with a broad, low, rounded hump. Surface minutely fibrillose, tending to develop fine, depressed scales. Brownish orange to reddish orange. Margin thin, often flaring in age. Stem cylindrical, becoming hollow. Surface fibrillose; moderate yellow to moderate orange with zones of reddish.

Similar species Many in Cortinarius and related genera.

Cortinarius orellanus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Cortinarius rubellus   (Deadly Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
Europe and parts of Asia
Dimensions
Cap 3-8 cm diameter, stem 5-11 cm tall * 0.8-1.5 cm diameter
Edibility
Lethally poisonous

Description
This lethally poisonous mushroom, which smells of radishes, is reddish orange with a pointed, umbonate cap covered with fibrils.

Cap conical to convex (partly flattening to umbonate with maturity). In colour, it is a tawny to date brown with paler margins, and is covered in fine, fibrous scales. The gills are ochre- or caramel-coloured, changing to a deeper brown with age as the spores mature. They have an adnate connection to the stipe. The Stem has a bulbous base. It is the same colour or slightly paler than the cap, and can have yellow fragments of the veil (cortina) attached to its lower half. The flesh is cream or pale yellow, but more tan below the pileipellis and in the stem base. It smells slightly of radishes and has no strong taste.

Similar species Cortinarius limonius, also poisonous, has more vivid orange coloring. Cortinarius orellanus has a less conical cap and grows near decidous trees.

Cortinarius rubellus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Cortinarius semisanguineus   (Poison Dye Cort)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-6 cm diameter, stem 2-10 cm tall * 0.4-1 cm thick
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
This smallish agaric has a yellowish tan cap, blood red gills, and yellowish stem not swollen at base. It grows typically with conifers and birch.

Cap olive- to dark reddish brown, convex to umbonate. Gills blood red, later more reddish rust and adnate, sinuate and fairly crowded. Spores are rusty brown. Stem more or less equal, paler than cap with threadlike remnants of veil. Stem flesh darker red-brown than cap flesh. The mushroom has no ring.

Cortinarius semisanguineus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Galerina marginata
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
Europe, North America, Asia and Australia
Dimensions
Cap 2.5-6.5 cm diameter, stem 3-9 cm tall * 0.3-0.8 cm diameter
Edibility
Lethally poisonous

Description
This small agaric, with yellowish tan, sticky cap, similarly colored as thegills and ring on stem, grows in clusters on stumps and logs of broad-leaf trees.

Cap starts convex, sometimes broadly conical, and has edges (margins) that are curved in against the gills. It becomes later broadly convex and then flattened, sometimes developing a central elevation, or umbo. Gills typically narrow and crowded, with a broadly adnate to nearly decurrent attachment to the stem and convex edges. They are a pallid brown when young, becoming tawny at maturity. Stem more or less equal or is slightly enlarged downward. Initially solid, it becomes hollow from the bottom up as it matures. The membranous ring is located on the upper half of the stem near the cap, but may be sloughed off and missing in older specimens. Above the level of the ring, the stem surface has a very fine whitish powder and is paler than the cap; below the ring it is brown down to the reddish-brown to bistre base.

Similar species Galerina marginata may be mistaken for a few edible mushroom species like Pholiota mutabilis, Armillaria mellea and Kuehneromyces mutabilis.

Galerina marginata on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Gyromitra esculenta   (False Morel)
Family
Discinaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
5-15 cm diameter, 5-12 cm tall, including stem
Edibility
Lethally poisonous

Description
Irregular, brown, brain-like structure on a pale stem. Grows solitary or in small trooping groups near conifers (pines), typically on acid, sandy soils.

The irregularly shaped Fruiting body reminds of a brain structure. Initially smooth, it becomes progressively more wrinkled as it grows and ages. The cap colour may be various shades of reddish-, chestnut-, purplish-, bay-, dark or sometimes golden-brown Stem attached to the cap at several points. Gyromitra esculenta has a solid stipe whereas those of true morels (Morchella spp.) are hollow. The spore print is whitish.

Warning This mushroom is deadly poisonous. Toxins allegedly lost after thorough cooking but, if ingested, the effect is probably cumulative with no immediate symptoms.

Similar species Gyromitra gigas, Gyromitra brunna, Gyromitra caroliniana and Gyromitra korfii are often larger and more vivid orange-brown; common in parts of North America.

Gyromitra esculenta on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Gyromitra esculenta on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Gyromitra infula   (Hooded false morel)
Family
Discinaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
2-8 cm diameter, 2-13 cm tall, including stem
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
This mushroom occurs in late summer and fall--not in the spring, when other species of Gyromitra can be found. Its broadly lobed cap is usually pinched into two lobes, creating a saddle-shaped appearance. Its color is variable.

Fruiting body occasionally nearly cup-shaped when young, but soon becoming lobed with two prominently raised lobes; bald; loosely wrinkled but usually not not brainlike; varies in color (tan to yellowish brown to reddish brown to dark brown); undersurface whitish to brownish, finely dusted, sometimes ingrown with stem where contact occurs. Stem equal to enlarged at the base, stuffed or hollow, round to compressed, sometimes with a longitudinal fold, surface glabrous to subpubescent, colored like the cap or lighter.

Similar species The deadly poisonous Gyromitra esculenta reminds of this mushroom.

Gyromitra infula on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Hebeloma crustuliniforme   (Poison Pie Hebeloma)
Family
Bolbitiaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-10 cm diameter, stem 4-7 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
This is a medium to large agaric with buff or tan, greasy cap, clay gills and stoutish, pale stem. It grows solitary or in small groups on soil in open mixed woodland. The mushroom is moderately poisonous.

Cap buff to pale tan, convex then umbonate with an inrolled cap margin until old. Gills pale grey-brown and exude droplets in moist conditions, adnate or adnexed, crowded. Spores are rust colored. Stem whitish, fairly stout, more or less equal, granular towards apex and the thick flesh is white. The mushroom has no ring.

Hebeloma crustuliniforme on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.