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Edible Mushrooms

Never pick and eat wild mushrooms unless they've been identified by an expert!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Many of these edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes and unless you are very experienced in mushroom identification, you can’t tell the difference between an edible mushroom and a poisonous one. Please read the disclaimer.

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Imleria badia   (Bay Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-14 cm diameter, stem 4-12 cm tall * 1-4 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Imleria badia, commonly known as Bay Bolete, is a large bolete with a bay-brown cap and lemon-yellow pores that bruises distinctively bluish green. It grows in coniferous or mixed woods on the ground or on decaying tree stumps.

Cap chestnut to dark brown, sometimes with brick-red or ochre tinges; almost spherical in young specimens before broadening and flattening out. It is at first downy, becoming smooth and polished, somewhat sticky when damp. The flesh is white or lemon-yellow. Where cut, it becomes faintly blue. Pores are initially cream to pale yellow but become greenish-yellow or olive with age. Stem is similar in colour to the cap but paler, and sometimes with a rose-coloured tinge and relatively slim and cylindrical (compared to many other boletes). The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include Boletus edulis which has a barrel-shaped stem with white net patterning.

Synonyms of Imleria badia include Boletus badius, Ixocomus badius and Xerocomus badius.

Imleria badia on the First Nature Web site.
Imleria badia on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Kuehneromyces mutabilis   (Sheathed Woodtuft)
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-6 cm diameter, stem 3-8 cm tall * 0.5-1 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Kuehneromyces mutabilis, also known as Sheathed Woodtuft, is a medium-sized agaric that has an umbonate honey-brown to yellow hat, which dries from the centre, producing a two-tone effect. It also has yellowish or reddish-brown gills and a ring on the stem. It grows clustered on stumps and logs of broad-leaf trees, favouring birch.

Cap convex, becoming flattened with a blunt umbo, and hygrophanous; as damp shiny and greasy with a deep orange-brown colour towards the rim; often there is a disc of lighter flesh in the middle. It is cinnamon-coloured as dry. Gills initially light and later cinnamon brown and broadly attached to the stem and crowded. Sometimes somewhat decurrent. Spores are ochre-brown. Stem pale and smooth light cinnamon above the ring and below darker brown shaggily scaly.

Similar species include the lethally poisonous Galerina unicolor and Galerina marginata which have fibers and no stem scales.

Warning: This mushroom should not be gathered to be eaten because it is so easily confused with the deadly poisonous Funeral Bell, Galerina marginata. Only very experienced fungi foragers should consider gathering this species.

Kuehneromyces mutabilis on the First Nature Web site.
Kuehneromyces mutabilis on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Laccaria laccata   (Common Laccaria)
Family
Hydnangiaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1.5-6 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 0.6-1 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Laccaria laccata, also know as Common Laccaria, is a smallish agaric that is reddish-brown throughout and has distant thickish gills and a fibrous stem. It grows in scattered trooping groups on soil in mixed woods and on heaths.

Cap typically reddish brow, but may be shades of pink-brown. It has a toothed margin and a slight depression in the center. Gills colored as cap, but becoming powdered white with spores, adnate, thick, broad distant. Stem colored as cap, robust and strongly fibrillose, often twisted and laterally compressed. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include Laccaria bicolor, which has contrasting, pale blue gills. Laccaria proxima is larger with more fibrillose stem. Laccaria ochropurpurea is much larger and has purple gills.

Laccaria laccata on the First Nature Web site.
Laccaria laccata on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lactarius deliciosus   (Saffron Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
Europe and North America
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 3-6 cm tall * 1.5 - 2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Lactarius deliciosus, also known as Saffron Milkcap, is an attractive, fairly large, buff agaric with distinctive salmon-pink blotches, pale carrot coloured gills. The mushroom exudes carroty milk, which is a significant characteristic of this mushroom. It grows solitary or in scattered groups on soil under conifers, favouring pine trees.

Cap first round and bumpy, then convex and as mature flat with a depressed center. The margin stays rolled in until maturity. It has concentrically zoned thin rings in orange and a somewhat wider zone in salmon go grey pink. Often with carrot coloured patches. Sticky and slippery when wet. Gills at first apricot or saffron, becoming carrot, dull green on bruising, dense and sub-decurrent before abruptly ending. Stem similarly coloured as the cap, thick and hard but also fragile, more or less equal, and patterned with different-sized shallow holes in a darker shade.

Similar species include Lactarius deterrimus found with spruce trees has a smooth stem and exudes green staining orange milk.

Lactarius "deliciosus" group on the First Nature Web site.
Lactarius "deliciosus" group on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lactarius deterrimus   (Orange milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 3-6 cm tall * 1.5 - 2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Lactarius deterrimus, also know as Orange milkcap, is a medium to large agaric that has a smooth stem, pale carrot gills and exudes green staining orange milk. It grows by itself or in groups scattered throughout soil under conifers, particularly pine and spruce trees.

Cap first round with a slightly depressed center and rolled-in margin. Then shallow to funnel-shaped. It has orange coloured zones that turn greener with age. Sticky or slippery when wet. Gills dense and slightly extending downward. Same colour as the cap. Stem similar in colour as the cap, smooth, tough, but at the same time delicate and fragile. Flesh dirty gray colored. It turns orange at the edges because of the carrot coloured milky liquid that escapes when broken. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include Lactarius deliciosus which grows with pine trees and the poisonous Lactarius helvus.

Lactarius deterrimus on the First Nature Web site.
Lactarius deterrimus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lactarius indigo   (Indigo milk cap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Mexico, and Guatemala
Dimensions
Cap 5-15 cm diameter, stem 2-8 cm tall * 1-2.5 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Lactarius indigo, also known as Indigo milk cap, is a medium to large indigo blue mushroom. The sticky cap surface has a silvery sheen. It grows solitary or grouped on forest soil, summer and fall.

Cap Firm, convex with a depressed disc and inrolled margin at first, becoming shallowly funnel-shaped. The surface is smooth, pale to light- or purplish-blue when fresh, later greyish or silvery. Gills Adnate to slightly decurrent and crowded close together. Their colour is an indigo blue, becoming paler with age or staining green with damage. Stem cylindric, hard, hollow. The surface is sticky and sometimes spotted. Spores pale yellowish.

Similar species Clitocybe nuda is to some degree a look-alike.

Lactarius indigo on Wikipedia.
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Lactarius volemus   (Luscious Lactarius)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-11 cm diameter, stem 4-12 cm tall * 1-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Lactarius volemus, also know as Luscious Lactarius, is a very fleshy, matte orange agaric that has a thin, cracking skin on its cap and a thick, velvety pale orange stem. When cut, its off-white, mild-tasting flesh produces white milk. Its fruit bodies grow on the ground at the base of various species of trees from summer to autumn, either individually or in groups.

Cap dry and velvety with a powdery matte texture and never sticky. Matte orange to red-brown coloured. At first slightly convex and develops a depression in the center later. The margin stays inrolled for some time. Gills creamy white, broadly attached to the stem slightly extending downward and densely packed. Turns brown when bruised. White drops often hang under the gills. Stem is similarly colored as the cap but more pallid. Tapers off and darkens towards the base. It has no ring.

Similar species include Lactarius hygrophoroides which is a good edible lacking the odor. It is equally common in eastern North America. It does not stain and has distant gills.

Lactarius volemus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Laetiporus sulphureus   (Chicken of the Woods)
Family
Polyporaceae
Location
Europe and North America
Dimensions
Cap 5 to 60 cm in diameter and 4 cm thick
Edibility

Description
The fruit bodies of this mushroom grow as striking golden-yellow shelf-like structures on tree trunks and branches. The undersurface of the fruit body is made up of tubelike pores rather than gills.

Fruiting body attached directly to the trunk of a tree and is initially knob-shaped, later expands to fan-shaped, typically overlapping shelves with thick margin. The upper surface colour ranges from bright whitish-yellow to bright whitish-orange. Flesh soft and coloured as cap surface. Old fruitbodies fade to tan or whitish. The under surface is sulphur-yellow with small pores or tubes and has a white spore print. When fresh, the flesh is succulent and exudes a yellowish juice, but soon becomes dry and brittle. It has a strong, fungusy smell.

Laetiporus sulphureus on the First Nature Web site.
Laetiporus sulphureus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Never eat a mushroom that you are not 100% sure is edible. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Please consider that many mushrooms take years of experience to identify reliably.

The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by ingesting poisonous mushrooms. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.