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Edible Mushrooms

Never pick and eat wild mushrooms unless they've been identified by an expert!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Many of these edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes and unless you are very experienced in mushroom identification, you can’t tell the difference between an edible mushroom and a poisonous one. Please read the disclaimer.

You can click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Russula claroflava   (Yellow Swamp Brittlegill)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-10 cm diameter, stem 4-10 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Russula claroflava, also known as Yellow Swamp Brittlegill, is a brightly coloured agaric that has a convex to flat, vivid yellow cap. It grows with birch in very damp or boggy woodland.

Cap bright yellow in colour, which diminishes with age, and slightly sticky when damp. It has thin, smooth skin that can easily be peeled off and often a depressed center. Gills at first white, then creamy yellow. Older ones can have grey or black edges, more or less free or reaching but not connected to the stem and fairly crowded. Stem is white, turns grey with age, more or less equal, fairly stout, and smooth. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include other Russula species. Russula ochroleuca has a green tinge on the cap. Russlula ochroleucoides is a bitter-tasting American equivalent, growing in East Coast oak woods.

Russula claroflava on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Russula decolorans   (Copper Brittlegill)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4.5-11 cm diameter, stem 4.5-10 cm tall * 1-2.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Russula decolorans, also know as Copper Brittlegill, is a medium to large agaric that has a distinctively coloured, often brick-red cap, pale yellow gills and white stem. All parts of the mushroom are greying or blackening.

Cap as young almost completely round, then convex to flat, often with a depressed center. At first bright orange-yellow, then more subdued brick-red, sometimes with a darker center. Sticky in damp weather, and has smooth skin that can be removed. Gills at first white, then creamy yellow and finally grey. Reaching but not attached to the stem. Stem is white, greying readily when bruised or with age, more or less equal or somewhat club-shaped, stout, and smooth. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species other Russula species.

Russula decolorans on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Russula obscura   (Darkening Brittlegill)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter, stem 6-12 cm tall * 1-3 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Russula obscura, also known as Russula vinosa, is a medium-sized agaric mostly found with pine.

Cap variably, brown-spotted, wine red, at first convex, becoming flattened or somewhat depressed. The flesh is pleasant-tasting and blackening where damaged. Gills cream coloured, crowded, adnexed and tinged grey with age. Stem is white but often tinged rose or greyish, blackening where bruised, somewhat club-shaped. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include other Russula species of which some are poisonous.
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Russula paludosa   (Tall Bog Russula)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter, stem 5-14 cm tall * 1-3 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Russula paludosa, also known as Tall Bog Russula, is a russula with a convex to depressed, orange-red cap, with yellow discolouration in the center and a slightly sticky surface when damp.

Cap convex to depressed, coloured a distinctive bloody red, pink, crimson or purple. Sometimes it may show a yellowish or orange tinge in the centre. At first convex, later flattened and depressed, shiny or somewhat sticky when damp, cuticle peeling halfway to center. Flesh white with a mild taste and without scent; it quickly becomes soft and spongy and also greyish. Gills are cream or pallid ochraceous, adnexed, brittle, narrow, strongly interveined. Spores pale ocher. Stem white or tinged pink, more or less equal or tapering slightly upwards, smooth. Flesh white, fragile, and stuffed. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include the poisonous and hot-tasting Russula emetica which has no yellow coloring on the cap and is smaller. Russula paludosa can also be confused with Amanita muscaria but can be distinguished by having veil patches on the cap, a stem ring, and a bulb.

Russula paludosa on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Russula xerampelina   (Crab Russula)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter; stem 3-11 cm tall * 1-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Russula xerampelina, also known as Crab Russula, is a medium to large agaric that has a hard-fleshed cap whose colour varies but is often dark red or purple. Mature plants have a fishy odour. All parts slowly stain dingy yellow-brown when cut or bruised.

Cap convex, becoming later flat, with a broad, shallow depression. Surface sticky when moist, but soon dry; smooth - not streaked or warty. Colour most often dark red, but may be dark purple, pink, green or brown, often with traces of yellow. Gills broad, close to subsistent, adnate, yellowish-white. Stem solid at first, later spongy. Surface white or flushed with pink; dry, smooth to wrinkled.

Russula xerampelina on the first-nature.com Web site.
Russula xerampelina on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Sarcodon squamosus   (Scaly Tooth)
Family
Bankeraceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 10-25 cm diameter, stem 4-7 cm tall * 2-4 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Sarcodon squamosus, also known as Scaly Tooth, is a large mushroom that has a coarsely scaly, pale brown cap with dark greyish, spiny under-surface. It grows particularly with pines, solitary or in scattered groups, on the soil in coniferous woods.

Fruiting body pale brown, decorated with coarse darker grey scales, erect at the centre, more flattened towards the incurved margin, arranged in concentric rows. It is at first shallowly convex, then flattened or slightly depressed at the centre; at first whitish, becoming grey, remaining pallid at the base, equal or somewhat clavate towards the base, downy. Flesh white, thick in the cap centre, firm, full in the stem. Spines 4 to 10mm long, decurrent, white or pale buff, turning purple-brown with age.

Sarcodon squamosus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus americanus   (American slippery Jack)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America
Dimensions
Cap 3–10 cm diameter, stem 3–9 cm cm tall * 0.4–1 cm cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Suillus americanus, also known as American slippery Jack, is a small- to medium-sized bolete with a slimy, bright yellow cap. The mushroom grows solitary to clustered on soil in association with pines, particularly eastern white pine.

Cap broadly convex with a small umbo (a central elevation) to flat with age. The margin has a soft cottony, yellowish veil material which leaves brownish patches as it dries. The colour is bright yellow with red or brownish streaks and hairy patches. When the fruit body is young and moist, the surface is slimy. Pores angular (slightly wider than long) and yellow. Spores light brown to brownish orange. Stem cylindric, more and less equal, though, slender, often bent. The colour is yellow and it is often dotted with brown spots.

Suillus americanus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Suillus bovinus   (Cow mushroom)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
Europe, Asia, North America and Australia
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 4-6 cm tall * 0.5-1 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Suillus bovinus, also known as the Cow mushroom, is a small, orange-rusty brown bolete, with a convex to flat cap and short, ringless stem. The mushroom occurs often in large groups beneath pine trees, often beside forest paths, in clearings and at the edges of woods.

Cap grey-yellow or ochre with a pink tinge, initially convex, then flat with a wavy margin. The flesh is spongy and rubbery, whitish, yellowish or clay-coloured and has a fruity smell. Pores generally recurrent, at first pallid olive or buff, becoming more ochraceous with age, angular, compound, unequal, large. Tubes greyish with vinaceous tinge, more or less decurrent. Spores brownish olive. Stem pallid yellowish sienna, more or less equal or tapering at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Suillus bovinus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Never eat a mushroom that you are not 100% sure is edible. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Please consider that many mushrooms take years of experience to identify reliably.

The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by ingesting poisonous mushrooms. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.