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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Agrocybe pediades   (Common Fieldcap)
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
North America and Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1-3 cm diameter, stem 2-5 cm tall * 0.1-0.3 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Agrocybe pediades, also known as Common Fieldcap, is a small agaric with a rounded dull brownish cap on a slender stem. The mushroom grows solitary or grouped on grassy areas, cultivated or disturbed soil, pastures etc.

Cap hemispheric to broadly rounded with a smooth surface that is is sticky when moist. It is first brown to yellowish-brown, fading quickly to light yellowish-brown or lighter. Gills close, adnate (broadly attached) but soon pulling free from the stem. Pallid at first, becoming strong brown as spores mature. Stem cylindric, fibrillose, yellowish-white above and yellowish-brown at the base. The mushroom has a partial veil that quickly disappears, leaving traces on the cap's edge.

Similar species Similar species include Marasmius oreades, Agrocybe praecox and Agrocybe putaminum.

Agrocybe pediades on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Albatrellus confluens
Family
Polyporaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 7-18 cm diameter, stem 3-7 cm tall * 1-3 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
From above, this pale orange polypore looks like an agaric or a hedgehog mushroom, but it has minute pores on the underside. The skin of the convex cap often cracks with age. It has a sturdy stem and very firm, mild to slightly bitter white flesh. Grows under conifers, mycorrhizal with conifers in a wide variety of ecosystems.

Similar species Albatrellus ovinus is more cream white and does stain yellow or greenish yellow, particularly on the pores.

Albatrellus confluens on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Amanita ceciliae   (Snakeskin Grisette)
Family
Amanitaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 7-12 cm diameter, stem 8-13 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Amanita ceciliae, also known as Snakeskin Grisette, is a large fleshy agaric whose cap is greyish-brown and has charcoal-grey patches, which are easily removable. It has also a scaly stem, white gills, and no ring or volval bag. It fruits during summer and autumn.

Cap is pallid gray-brown; shape ranging from convex to flat. It is upturned and has a deep-coloured margin. There is a low umbo. Large, coarse, dingy grey patches decorate the volva. The flesh is white and firm. Gills are free and closely spaced, and white in colour. They can be thick and are often forked. Stem is pallid, greyish brown with white shaggy horizontal bands of the veil; an inconspicuous bulb is encased in a volval bag breaking away leaving slanting ridges. The mushroom has no ring.

Amanita ceciliae on the First Nature Web site.
Amanita ceciliae on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Amanita fulva   (Tawny grisette)
Family
Amanitaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-9 cm diameter, stem 7-12 cm tall * 0.8-1.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Amanita fulva, also known as Tawny grisette, is a medium-sized agaric with distinctive tawny cap and white gills, no ring and usually without cap patches but with volval bag. It grows solitary or scattered on soil in mixed woodlands, favouring birch. The mushroom is not recommended to be eaten because of the danger to be mistaken with poisonous members of the Amanita genus.

Cap orange-brown, paler towards the margin, and darker (even very dark brown) in the center, up to 10 cm in diameter. It is at first ovoid, becoming expanded-convex and flattened. It develops an umbo when expanded, and has a strongly striated margin. Its surface is smooth, slightly sticky and slippery when moist and glistens; later it may dry. Flesh white and brittle. Stem whitish or pallid cap coulor, narrower towards the apex and arising from white volval bag. Hollow in marture specimens. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Amanita crocea and Amanita vaginata.

Amanita fulva on the First Nature Web site.
Amanita fulva on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Ampulloclitocybe clavipes   (Club Foot)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-8 cm diameter, stem 3-7 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Ampulloclitocybe clavipes, commonly known as Club Foot is best identified by its club-shaped stem, which is swollen at the base and tapering toward the top and funnel-shaped cap with white girls that extend downward. It grows solitary or in small troops on soil in broad-leaf woods, favouring beech.

Cap convex with a small boss, becoming plane to depressed in shape. It has a smooth surface. Cap colours are generally grey-brown, sometimes tinged olive, with a pale margin. Gills are strongly decurrent and cream-yellow in colour, contrasting with the rest of the mushroom. There are some smaller gills in between the regular gills, and the gills are occasionally forked near the stem. The gill edges are straight in younger mushrooms and sometimes wavy (undulate) in older ones. Flesh white, but slightly yellow at the base. Stem bulbous base, its surface is covered in silky fibres, and it is the same colour as the cap.

Synonyms the newer name for Clitocybe clavipes is Ampulloclitocybe clavipes.

Ampulloclitocybe clavipes on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Ampulloclitocybe clavipes on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Armillaria mellea   (Honey Mushroom)
Family
Physalacriaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-15 cm diameter, stem 6-15 cm tall * 0.5-1.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Armillaria mellea, also known as Honey Mushroom, is a medium-sized agaric that has a convex, flattened, or wavy, olive-tinged, pale yellow-brown cap with a darker center and sparse pale scales. It grows, midsummer to late fall, densely clustered or in groups, around bases of living or dead trees or stumps of either coniferous or hardwood trees.

Cap convex at first but becoming flattened, often with a central raised umbo, later becoming somewhat dish-shaped. The margins are often arched at maturity and the surface is sticky when wet. Though typically ochraceous, this fungus is rather variable in appearance and sometimes has a few dark, hairy scales near the centre somewhat radially arranged. The flesh is white, thin and firm. Gills at first white, sometimes becoming pinkish-yellow or discoloured with age, broad and fairly distant, attached to the stipe at right angles or are slightly decurrent, crowded. The spore print is white. Stem at first whitish, becoming yellowish or reddish-brown, more or less equal or tapering towards the base, finely wholly. The ring is yellowish, cottony or woolly, superior and fairly persistent.

Similar species include Galerina marginata, which is deadly poisonous.

Note Armillaria species were for many years generally considered edible but lately, members of the honey fungus group (including Armillaria mellea) has been found to be suspect, as cases of poisoning have been linked to eating these mushrooms.

Armillaria mellea on the First Nature Web site.
Armillaria mellea on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Auriscalpium vulgare   (Pinecone Tooth)
Family
Auriscalpiaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1-2 cm diameter; stem 2-6 cm tall * 0.1-0.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Auriscalpium vulgare, also know as Pinecone Tooth, is a small to long medium-sized fungus, with a brown cap attached at one side or off the centre of the stem. The long, slender, stem rises from decaying pine cones.

Cap flat to rounded. Upper side brown to dark purplish brown, covered with dark brown fibrils. Under side spiny. Flesh thin, flexible. Spines light to dark brown. Stem brown, hairy, rigid, joined laterally to the cap, swollen towards the base.

Auriscalpium vulgare on the First Nature Web site.
Auriscalpium vulgare on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Bankera fuligineoalba   (Blushing Flagrant Tooth)
Family
Bankeraceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter; stem 2-5 cm tall * 0.5-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Bankera fuligineoalba, also known as Blushing Flagrant Tooth, is a medium to large, fleshy to fibrous cap with spiny under surface. It is dark yellowish-brown at center to yellowish pink or pinkish-brown on margin. It becomes much darker and quickly water-soaked in wet weather.

Cap convex at first, becoming flat or depressed at center. Margin thin, in-curved when young, lobed and wavy later. At first pallid, then brown with yellow or red tinges, remaining more pallid at the margin. Pine needles adhere to densely mattered surface fibrils. The flesh is soft and brittle. Stem white at the apex, becoming dull brownish below, equal or tapered towards the base, downy, sometimes eccentric.

Similar species Bankera violascens has a clean, regularly shaped cap with lilac tints; it grown with spruce. Sarcodon species have colored spores.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Never eat a mushroom that you are not 100% sure is edible. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Please consider that many mushrooms take years of experience to identify reliably.

The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by ingesting poisonous mushrooms. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.