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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Entoloma vernum   (Pinkgill mushroom)
Family
Entolomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-4 cm diameter, stem 2-7 cm tall * 0.2-0.6 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Entoloma vernum, also known as Pinkgill mushroom, is a small agaric that has a grey-brown cap and stem, with brown gills. It can be seen mainly in spring, but also during summer and autumn, and occur as solitary or in small trooping groups in grasslands, often near conifers.

Cap greyish tan or darker, conic to broadly conic, flattening out somewhat but retaining a sharp, central umbo; dry; silky to nearly bald; Flesh brown, thin and fragile. Gills tan-brown or greyish, becoming pinkish, narrowly attached to the stem, or nearly free from it; close or nearly distant.Spores are pink coloured. Stem equal, or slightly tapered toward the apex; finely fibrillose near the apex, but nearly bald elsewhere; brownish to tan or brown overall, but paler at the apex. Flesh same colour as surface, pithy or narrowly hollow. The mushroom has no ring.

Entoloma vernum on the First Nature Web site.
Entoloma vernum on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Geastrum rufescens   (Rosy earthstar)
Family
Geastraceae
Location
Europe, North America and Asia
Dimensions
2.5 - 5 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Geastrum rufescens, also known as Rosy earthstar, is a globe-shaped pale brown fruitbody that opens on maturity. Its outer skin splits into a star shape. Inside is a pale grey to grey buff ball, which contains the spores. It grows usually clustered in light soil around decaying hardwood stumps, summer to fall.

Fruiting body first globe-shaped, yellow brown, partially submerged in the substrate, covered with mycelium that picks up dirt and debris. Opens on maturity so its outer skin splits into a star shape with 6–8 pink to pinkish tan, radiating, pointed arms.

Similar species There are over 50 species in Geastrum genus of which many differs only slightly from Geastrum rufescens.

Geastrum rufescens on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.

The second photo is by Jimmy Craine and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.
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Gymnopilus picreus
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
Europe, North America
Dimensions
Cap 2-4 cm diameter, stem 4-7 cm tall * 0.4-1 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Gymnopilus picreus is a medium-sized saprotrophic agaric with an orange-brown cap that grows on conifer wood and sometimes on hardwood. Fruit bodies appear in summer and autumn.

Cap bell shaped at first, later flattening out and orange-brown coloured. Gills adnexed or adnate, colour vivid yellow. Stem darker orange-brown than cap and darkening towards the base, covered with small light gray scales.

Similar species include Galerina marginata which has a more lighter coloured stem and cap.
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Gymnopus peronatus   (Wood Woollyfoot)
Family
Omphalotaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-6 cm diameter, stem 6-8 cm tall * 0.3-0.5 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Gymnopus peronatus, also known as Wood Woollyfoot is a small saprobic agaric that grows generally in smaller or larger clumps on leaves or needles in deciduous or coniferous woods and may be found from May to December.

Cap convex, expand and flatten out at maturity, sometimes retaining a broad umbo. Color quite variable, ranging from pinkish cream to yellowish or reddish-brown. Gills coloured as the cap or somewhat lighter, becoming reddish-brown as the fruitbody matures. Stem roughly the same colour as the cap. It is typically pruinose ("frosted") above and strigose (hairy) near the base.

Gymnopus peronatus on the First Nature Web site.
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Hortiboletus rubellus   (Ruby Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
Europe, Eastern United States
Dimensions
Cap 6 cm; stem 7,5 cm tall * 1-3 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Hortiboletus rubellus, also known as Xerocomellus rubellus or Ruby Bolete, is a relatively small bolete with scarlet to raspberry red cap, reddish stem and yellow pores, occurring largely with oak.

Cap scarlet to raspberry red when young, with a dry velvety texture. The extreme margin often has a pale yellow or white band around it, and it discolours darker, and dirtier with age. Pores small; pale yellow, and bruise slowly. Spores the spore print is olive. Stem slender and long. It is lemon yellow at the apex, but red elsewhere, and has a tendency to split or sheer vertically.

Similar species Hortiboletus Simonini.

Hortiboletus rubellus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Xerocomellus rubellus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca   (False Chanterelle)
Family
Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-8 cm diameter, stem 3-5 cm tall * 0.5-1 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca, also commonly knows as False Chanterelle, is a smallish orange-yellow agaric that has a shallowly funnel-shaped cap reminiscent of a chanterelle but with true gills. It grows typically among needle litter, rotten wood, or sawdust.

Cap golden-orange, initially convex but becoming funnel-shaped as the mushroom matures. The cap margin, which remains rolled in a little, becomes wavy or lobed in age. The cap surface is covered with a fine down. Gills decurrent, narrow and forked, which is a distinctive and distinguishing feature. They are generally a more intense shade of orange than the cap. Stem is similarly colored as the cap. It is stout, more or less equal, smooth, and typically curved. The gills may be slightly crimped along the stem. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species include Cantharellus cibarius, Omphalotus illudens and Omphalotus olearius.

Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca on the First Nature Web site.
Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Hypholoma capnoides   (Conifer Tuft)
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-7 cm diameter, stem 5-8 cm tall, 0.5-1 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Hypholoma capnoides, also known as Conifer Tuft, is a small or medium-sized agaric that has a yellowish-orange cap and has veil remnants visible at the pale margin. It is greasy when wet.

Cap yellow to orange or brownish colour with pale yellow flesh. Gills initially pale orangish-yellow, pale grey when mature, later darker purple/brown. Spore print dark burgundy/brown. Stem yellowish, somewhat rust-brown below.

Similar species Hypholoma fasciculare and Hypholoma sublateritium, which are poisonous, also Hypholoma radicosum which is much rarer but is found in similar sites.

Hypholoma capnoides on the First Nature Web site.
Hypholoma capnoides on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Hypholoma marginatum   (Snakeskin Brownie)
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
Europe and North America
Dimensions
Cap 1.5-4 cm diameter; stem 3-7 cm tall x 0.2-0.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Hypholoma marginatum, also known as Snakeskin Brownie, is a smallish agaric with a usually tan cap whose colour is very variable and, therefore, cannot be used effectively as an identification feature. That's however hardly a problem because the snakeskin patterning on the stem is so distinctive. It grows in small trooping groups on needles or rotting wood with coniferous trees.

Cap convex, flattening out at maturity but retaining a shallow umbo; inrolled margin of young caps is covered with silky remnants of the partial veil; colour rather variable but most often brick red in the centre and paler towards the margin. Gills at first pallid yellow, then olivaceous-brown, adnate or emarginate, crowded. Spores chocolate-brown. Stem silvery mottled appearance, fibrous; light ochre at apex, darkening progressively to a reddish-brown base; a faint ring zone is usually discernable.

Hypholoma marginatum on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Never eat a mushroom that you are not 100% sure is edible. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Please consider that many mushrooms take years of experience to identify reliably.

The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by ingesting poisonous mushrooms. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.