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Poisonous Mushrooms

Here is a list of some poisonous mushrooms, of which many are deadly poisonous. Do not under any circumstances taste or eat of any of these mushrooms.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Paxillus involutus   (Poison Pax)
Family
Paxillaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-12 cm diameter, stem 3-7 cm tall * 0.8-1.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
Paxillus involutus, also know as Poison Pax, has a strongly inrolled, yellow- to red-brown cap, with a downy margin and slightly depressed center and ochre-brown gills. It grows solitary or in trooping groups on soil in leaf woods.

Cap initially convex then more funnel-shaped with a depressed centre and rolled rim, may be reddish-, yellowish- or olive-brown in colour. The surface is initially downy and later smooth, becoming sticky when wet. Gills brownish yellow, narrow, decurrent and forked, and can be peeled easily from the flesh. They further down toward the stem become more irregular and anastomose. Stem is similarly colored as the cap, however bruising darker brown. It is smooth, equal or tapering downwards. The mushroom has not ring.

Similar species Paxillus filamentous has a less incurved margin, yellow flesh, and occurs under alder.

Paxillus involutus on the First Nature Web site.
Paxillus involutus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Russula emetica   (The Sickener)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 4-9 cm tall * 0.7-2 cm thick
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
Russula emetica, also know as The Sickener, is a medium-sized agaric that has a convex to slightly depressed, sharlet-red cap. It grows mainly with coniferous trees in boggy areas. It is not highly poisonous and has a very hot taste.

Cap convex to slightly depressed, and often shiny scarlet or cherry red, becoming sticky at wet. Gills are whitish, becoming pallid straw, more or less free, brittle, and narrow. Spores are white. Stem white, club shaped with a scurfy skin.

Similar species Russula silvicola is the common dry woodland species across North America. Russula fageticola usually grows under beech trees, and it also tastes hot. Amanita muscaria has veil patches on the cap, a stem ring, and a bulb.

Russula emetica on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Stropharia hornemannii   (Conifer Roundhead)
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-15 cm diameter, stem 6-12 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility
Poisonous

Description
Stropharia hornemannii, also known as Conifer Roundhead, is a medium-sized to large agaric with a large slimy purple or olive cap whose gills become purple with age. The stalk is long and richly decorated with pieces of the white sheath that extends up to a prominent ring.

Cap domed with an inrolled margin, becoming broadly umbonate; usually violet brown, sometimes with yellow tints, but occasional specimens are creamy white; surface sticky when wet, drying silky smooth. Stem smooth and white above ring zone; below ring covered in small white scales that become larger and more pronounced with age.

Stropharia hornemannii on the first-nature.com Web site.
Stropharia hornemannii on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.